Publikationen

Adolescents’ attitudes towards the ideal division of routine housework tasks between parents: The impact of socialization experiences

Bernhardt, Janine/Kleinschrot, Leonie
Adolescents’ attitudes towards the ideal division of routine housework tasks between parents: The impact of socialization experiences. Manchester "European Sociological Association (ESA)." 23.08.2019
Despite the rise of egalitarian gender ideologies and increasing labor force participation of mothers in Western Europe, parents’ division of housework has remained persistently unequal. The literature offers two major streams of explanation: structural constraints and the intergenerational transmission of gender culture. While structural barriers, e.g. to balancing work and family roles, are well documented, only few studies have been able to look into transmission processes of gender roles from parents to children. We still know little about how young people imagine an ideal division of typically gender-typed housework tasks and how their attitudes link to socialization experiences during childhood. In this paper, we use multi-actor panel data for Germany to study how adolescents’ attitudes towards the ideal division of housework tasks are related to their parents’ actual division of housework tasks earlier in childhood. We investigate how this relationship differs according to child gender and the presence of siblings. Finally, we test whether daughters’ and sons’ own involvement in housework mediates this relationship. The empirical analyses use two panel waves from AID:A, a national survey of children, adolescents and young adults. We restrict the sample to two-parent families and combine information from 2018 on adolescents’ attitudes towards the ideal division of housework tasks among opposite-sex parenting couples with information from 2014/15 on parents’ actual housework division as reported by mothers. The final sample consists of 650 mother-child dyads. First results indicate that both female and male adolescents’ attitudes towards the ideal division of typically female tasks are far more egalitarian than their parents’ task division, whereas their attitudes about typically male tasks are strongly gender-typed.